Nitrogen, pesticide applications at full speed!

Better weather gives us a window to work.

Wow, time has been flying past (and this holiday weekend has me all off balance). Since I last sat at this keyboard, we have finished planting. We have begun in-crop spray and side-dress applications.

So, what did we decide on replanting those fields (see Finishing only to replant?) We tore them up and started over, re-planting to non-gmo seed. Not what anybody wants to do, however it appears to have worked out well. We have a good stand and were able to destroy most of what was already growing.

We also replanted about 60 acres of soybeans. This was scattered in spots across four different fields. We just dropped in on top of what was there and planted between 50-100% of normal population to supplement what was there. The weather has certainly straightened out. Hopefully we have turned the corner in this area. After being missed by all significant rainfall, we are ready for a nice gentle 1” soaker.

Spray frustration

Spraying has been a source of frustration. Applications made two weeks ago did not work. Use of a new product has us questioning its efficacy. As with many ‘new’ products, it is a combination of two pre-existing products. One of the products we had been using very successfully, so when they added a second product to make it even better we thought the new mix would be a good fit. Unfortunately the new mix at full labeled rates equates to a lower rate than we were using before, while the second product has no activity on already growing weeds. I am hopeful the failure was due to the weather conditions. Between the time the failure was identified and a remedy provided, I sprayed an additional several hundred acres. Not a good thing if it doesn’t work on these subsequent applications. I simply don’t have the time to re-do work. It didn’t help that the company rep seemed to be questioning me. We chose a premium mixed product because we don’t want to do things twice… or thrice… None the less, we push forward.


The opinions of the author are not necessarily those of Farm Futures or Penton Agriculture.

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