With soybeans nearly complete, attention turns to corn

With soybeans nearly complete, attention turns to corn

We haven't gotten too deep into corn, but yields at 15% less than average seem to be the rule

With very good weather the last couple of weeks, we are closing in on completing soybean harvest. We need about two or two-and-a-half more days.

On the other hand, the weather has been so good corn harvest has been on hold for the most part. Hopefully we will be the beneficiary of the natural air drying this year.

So, let's get to it. Once again, this is report week. Here is what we've been seeing:

Yields have varied greatly within fields. The combine monitor cannot be trusted as it averages based on harvested acres. We farmers tend to raise the heads high and try to avoid ingesting large patches of weeds. So, care must be taken to do the math based on real acres.

We haven't gotten too deep into corn, but yields at 15% less than average seem to be the rule

Soybeans are 10% off of last year, below our five year average. A prime example is two irrigated fields; the same bean as we planted last year (on the other side of the farm) was 10% less this year.

As I stated, we haven't gotten too deep into corn, but 15% less than average seems to be the rule. The larger concern is the dirty fields. June rains diluted much of the residual chemistry we used. The same rains prevented planned crop herbicide applications.

The old 4840 has been put back into the rotation as we have had to run the mower through spots in many fields before tillage can be done. As expected, all fields show signs of nitrogen deficiency. The first of two Corn Growers' plots we tended to was not good enough to spend extra time to harvest for the contest, despite the addition nitrogen, fungicide, and insecticide applications.

All in all, I don't want to sound too pessimistic. Generally yields have been better than we expected and despite hiccups, harvest has been going quickly.

It's a good thing when you have to make enough time to keep up with the little things that have to be done!

The opinions of Kyle Stackhouse are not necessarily those of Farm Futures or the Penton Farm Progress Group.

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