Telling Your Story

Do You Trust Social Media?

People today are more likely to believe social media than traditional news sources

Remember the days gone by when everyone wanted to be home to watch the world news at 5:30 p.m.? The trusted source for news was a few well-known TV anchors whose voices you could immediately pick up on.

No longer are there just a few voices offering news. Now it is everywhere at any time of the day. Sometimes it's difficult to pick out what is true and doesn't have a political spin on it. 

Today, people are more likely to be influenced by what their connections are recommending and talking about. Many people are connecting (and reconnecting) through social media. 

Are we a society that because something is in print (and have been taught for years to believe what is printed is indeed factual), that we trust the print to be true? Will our children, who have had more written word thrown at them from earlier ages, be more discerning in what they believe to be true?

It's hard to tell.

What we know today, is that people are more likely to get their news through social media and trust what their friends like and are encouraging. 

Just what does this have to do with agriculture? More than ever, agriculture people need to have a presence in social media, and share within our connections what we know to be true about our farms. We need to tell about what's happening on our farm – the victories and the hardships, show pictures of our daily occurrences, and talk about why we use modern practices on our farms. 

It takes the average person reading something seven times before they remember it.  So it doesn't hurt to repeat your message over and over again!

Other people are telling a story about modern agriculture. Is that the story that you know to be true on your farm? It is up to each one of us to share our little bit with the people we know. 

You are a sphere of influence with the people you know. We each need to listen for opportunities to have conversations about our farms, speak up and tell what we know to be true on our own farms.

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