6 Stories To Read Now: Farmers React to EPA's 'Waters of the U.S.' Rule

6 Stories To Read Now: Farmers React to EPA's 'Waters of the U.S.' Rule

EPA's release of waters of the U.S. language spurs an opposition campaign from the American Farm Bureau Federation

Just a little more than one week ago, the Environmental Protection Agency opened comments on language defining the waters of the U.S. – language that will later be used to determine jurisdiction for the Clean Water Act, a piece of legislation intended to control pollution in American Waters.

As most farmers and ranchers know, there's no shortage of opinion on the topic, most of which centers on a concern that the new definition could result in more regulation of private land.

Related: EPA Opens Comments on Waters of the US Language

EPA's release of waters of the U.S. language spurs an opposition campaign from the American Farm Bureau Federation

While the reaction varies in its form – some farmers authoring blog posts, others sharing tweets and photos – the discussion is certainly heating up, thanks to encouragement from a campaign recently initiated by the American Farm Bureau Federation.

But where there's opposition, there's bound to be support. In an op-ed for political news outlet The Hill, Colorado farmer Richard Kaup makes a case for supporting the rule, outlining previous triumphs of the CWA.

Read these stories and more about EPA's new water proposal by following the links below:

1. Whatever floats your boat: redefining the waters of the U.S. Huffington Post/AFBF Blog

2. EPA Clean Water Act ruling works for agriculture and for the nation. The Hill

3. Water Police, Part One: EPA coming to your farm? (Five-part series) Farm Futures

4. Group supports EPA proposal for expanded regulation of waterways. Radio Iowa

5. Farm Bureau pledges to fight EPA's water rule. The Hill

6. Regulators regulate regulators while eating unregulated foreign food. Farm Press

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish