Crop Health Below Year-Ago Levels

Crop Health Below Year-Ago Levels

This year's weather extremes are taking their toll on U.S. crops.

Farm Futures has partnered with the Ecology and Agriculture Spatial Analysis Laboratory at Kansas State University to bring these maps to you. Each map is composed from satellite data taken over a two-week period. The EASAL maps show current vegetative health for the past two weeks and compare vegetative health with the previous two-week period, with the previous year and with the long-term average. Green reflects healthy vegetative development, while brown reflects a lack of healthy vegetative biomass production.

Satellite imagery shows active vegetative growth and development stretching from eastern Nebraska north and east into Minnesota, and then southeastward from there into northern Illinois. Vegetative health remains very poor across much of the drought-stricken Southern Plains, as well as much of the inter-mountain West.

Satellite imagery shows much better than normal crop health in wetter areas of the Northern Plains and northwestern Midwest. Meanwhile, intense heat and dryness leaves crops in very poor health from central Kansas south to the Gulf Coast. Other areas of poor crop health relative to normal are scattered throughout the South, the Mid-Atlantic and portions of the eastern Midwest.

Satellite imagery reflects improvement in crop health over the past couple of weeks along much of the Mississippi River Valley and in scattered areas of the South that have received beneficial rainfall. However, vegetative health deteriorated significantly in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, as well as in portions of the central and southeastern Plains that have been baking in triple-digit heat this month.

Vegetative health is better than year ago levels across scattered areas of the West, the Northern Plains and New England. However, crop health is significantly below year ago levels in the eastern Midwest and across much of the South and in dramatically worse condition from central Kansas south to the Gulf Coast.

This graphic shows the average vegetative health for this time of year.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish