EPA proposes stricter requirements for restricted-use pesticide applicators

EPA proposes stricter requirements for restricted-use pesticide applicators

EPA proposes improved training and minimum age requirements for restricted-use pesticide applicators

EPA this week released a proposed rule that would apply stricter standards to certified applicators of restricted-use pesticides and to require all people who apply restricted use pesticides to be at least 18 years old. Under the proposal, certifications would have to be renewed every three years.

Related: Pesticide Safety Starts With The Label

"Restricted-use” pesticides are not available for purchase by the general public, require special handling, and may only be applied by a certified applicator or someone working under his or her direct supervision.

EPA proposes improved training and minimum age requirements for restricted-use pesticide applicators

. “By improving training and certification, those who apply these restricted use pesticides will have better knowledge and ability to use these pesticides safely,” said Jim Jones, EPA assistant administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention.

Also in the proposal, EPA is suggesting additional specialized licensing for fumigation and aerial application.

For further protection, those working under the supervision of certified applicators would now need training on using pesticides safely and protecting their families from take-home pesticide exposure.

State agencies issue licenses to pesticide applicators who need to demonstrate under an EPA-approved program their ability to use these products safely.

EPA says the proposed revisions would reduce the burden on companies or applicators working in multiple states by encouraging inter-state recognition of licenses.

The proposal also updates the requirements for States, Tribes, and Federal agencies that administer their own certification programs to incorporate the strengthened standards.

Many states already have in place some or many of EPA’s proposed changes. The estimated benefits of $80.5 million would be due to fewer acute pesticide incidents to people.

A 90 day public comment period will begin when the proposal is published in the Federal Register.


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Source: EPA

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