Mammary gland study has dairy farming impact

Mammary gland study has dairy farming impact

Zoetis grant continues to fund research on mammary gland development; research ultimately impacts dairy farming

Research on mammary gland development will continue at the University of California, Santa Cruz, thanks to $150,000 in research funding from Zoetis.

The award is part of the competitive Zoetis Cattle Call research grant program, which supports efforts by North American researchers and veterinarians to improve dairy and beef cattle performance.

This year's grant recipients, Lindsay Hinck, Ph.D., professor of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, along with Sharmila Chatterjee, Ph.D., a postdoctoral scholar, are working on basic research that could identify potential pathways to higher milk production in dairy cattle.

Zoetis grant continues to fund research on mammary gland development; research ultimately impacts dairy farming (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Unintended benefits
Hinck's research lab studies mammary gland development and stem cell biology, focusing primarily on human breast cancer.

"I had never thought about the practical role our research could play in the dairy industry," Hinck said. "It turns out that our investigation into regulatory mechanisms governing mammary stem cells can directly translate to milk production. This is a new and exciting direction for our research program."

Roger Saltman, DVM, MBA, group director of Cattle and Equine Technical Services at Zoetis, said basic biological research is the foundation for solutions that could help improve cattle health and productivity in the future.

Related: Research examines how dairy genetics affect cow fertility

"We see many innovative ideas through our Cattle Call research grant program," Saltman said. "What's interesting about this proposal is that mammary development is a fundamental process that is not fully understood.

"Research such as this holds great promise for the dairy industry as we strive to get more milk from the same number of cows," he said.

Source: Zoetis

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