Monsanto Pledges $20 Million for Technology Center Advancements

Monsanto Pledges $20 Million for Technology Center Advancements

Investment in integrated technology centers will improve plant breeding, Monsanto says

Monsanto this week reinforced its commitment to further improve the genetic potential of seeds by announcing a $20 million investment in integrated technology centers as part of its global breeding program.

These technology centers will utilize continuing advancements in data science, genomic breeding methods and predictive analytics to further enhance seeds, Monsanto said. This work will help farmers unlock untapped yield potential, the company added.

Related: Plant Breeding Has Been Critical To Soybean Yield Increases

Investment in integrated technology centers will improve plant breeding, Monsanto says

"We are at a unique inflection point in the evolution of plant breeding where data science and predictive analytics will help to unlock previously untapped potential of plant genetics," said Sam Eathington, Monsanto vice president of global plant breeding. "Monsanto is committed to continue to deliver new agricultural solutions through plant breeding so that farmers can keep up with the growing demands of food production in the face of population growth and climate change."

Related: Corn Breeders Search for New Inbreds to Make Improved Hybrids

The $20 million pledge will accelerate plant breeding research across integrated technology centers in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota and Nebraska. These integrated technology centers will enable the company to combine some local operations, utilize new advancements and discoveries, as well as share best practices across crop research, Monsanto said.

"Advanced plant breeding techniques and the application of data science are key elements working together to contribute to a food-secure future. And we're scaling our breeding engine to develop products that help farmers around the world meet this challenge," Eathington said.

Source: Monsanto

TAGS: Soybean
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