Protein, Oil Levels Higher in 2013 Soybean Crop

Protein, Oil Levels Higher in 2013 Soybean Crop

Checkoff-funded Crop Quality Survey shows less regional variation in protein, oil levels

The average protein and oil levels in the 2013 U.S. soybean crop ticked upward, according to the soy-checkoff-funded Crop Quality Survey. Average oil levels jumped to 19%, a 0.5- point increase from 2012 levels, while average protein levels grew by 0.4%age points to 34.7%.

U.S. soy's biggest customer, the global animal agriculture sector, takes note of the protein content in the soybeans it uses, says Laura Foell, chair of the United Soybean Board's Meal Action Team.

Checkoff-funded Crop Quality Survey shows less regional variation in protein, oil levels

"Our customers buy our soybeans for the components: protein and oil," says Foell, who farms in Schaller, Iowa. "The animal agriculture sector uses protein to feed animals, and the food industry uses the majority of soybean oil for human consumption and the rest for industrial-like biodiesel. The more protein and oil we have in our soybeans, the more product we have for our end-customers. And more demand could lead to a better price for our crop."

The study found less regional variation in protein and oil levels in 2013 than in previous years. These typical regional differences result from climate events and other factors outside of farmers' control.

Foell says farmers should talk with their seed representatives about soybean varieties that will produce higher levels of protein and oil without sacrificing yield.

The U.S. soy industry provides its customers with a total quality experience: high-performing products delivered by a reliable, consistent and sustainable soy supply chain. And the checkoff's international arm, the U.S. Soybean Export Council, will use the results of this year's crop quality survey to help build and maintain a preference for U.S. soy products in the international market.

Source: United Soybean Board

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